Myspace giveaway and–first review!

Some exciting things this week on LRK-world, week four of the Fifteen Weeks of Bees.  First, you’ve seen Mary Russell’s latest post over on her Myspace blog?  We’ll post the same episode of her ongoing story on Mutterings tomorrow, however, the drawing we’re doing this week will go to someone who posts a comment on Russell’s blog itself, so you might think of taking a gander and making a remark.

And the great puzzle we did last week? Wait until you see the even fancier one we post next week!

But–bang the drums and blow the brasses!–the first review of The Language of Bees is out, and Booklist has given it a star!  Although, if you’re allergic to spoilers, read no further, because as the reviewer admits, “It is almost impossible to talk about plot in this latest without revelation.”:

Intricate clockworks, wheels within wheels, a kaleidoscope of patterns that periodically locks into place to reveal a clear but ominous vision—so are the absorbing series of stories King has written about the young theology scholar and American feminist Mary Russell, who is married to the great detective Sherlock Holmes. It is almost impossible to talk about plot in this latest without revelation. Holmes and Russell return to England in August 1924, after traveling around the world, to find that Holmes’ bees are inexplicably dying and that Holmes had a son by Irene Adler. Damian, the son, suffered as a soldier in the Great War, is a famed surrealist artist, and has a wife and child, both of whom disappear, prompting Holmes to take a case with the most personal of connections. Along the way, we are treated to a great deal about ancient sites in England; a major supporting role from Holmes’ brother, Mycroft; information on an occult set of beliefs possibly related to Aleister Crowley; a terrifying set piece on the horrors of early air travel; and discourse on the queasy pleasures of surrealist art—all in Mary Russell’s wry, brilliant, and occasionally utterly deluded voice. We also see both Sherlock and Mycroft reveal human depths to themselves and to us. Although the novel does have an end, nothing is resolved: “To be continued,” King tells us, in the most frustrating of finales. Readers will want the rest right now, and even without a satisfying ending, they will realize that this is one of the best of a uniformly superlative series.

Thanks, Booklist, for getting us off to a great start.

Comments

  1. No major spoiler puzzlebit there that couldn’t have been deduced from previously available information – but oh! so great to sense the reviewer’s enthusiasm radiating from every line!

  2. Holy crikey! I dunno if I can wait! The book sounds utterly fascinating and intense!

    Congrats on the review :)! CANNOT wait to read it!

  3. Oh, now you’re just being mean.
    Whaddya mean, ‘to be continued…’!
    Aaaaaugh!

  4. I didn’t read the review because I want to remain fairly spoiler free (until it’s a little closer to the time that I have the book in my hands, anyway; the wait *should* be less tortuous that way) but many congratulations on the starred review!

  5. AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    We’re only 3 or 4 WEEKS into the 15. This is agonizing.

    WOOO HOOO on the review!

    🙂 Sara, who is possibly going to die of anticipation.

  6. “uniformly superlative series” — says it all.

    Going to check the counter thingie on VBC.

  7. Laurie, dear Laurie, you must be running very low on energy just now. However, your ravening pack of readers is already baying for the next Russell, the one after TLOB. We can and must contain ourselves until 26 April, but what can you tell us anent their adventures after 1924? It would be very nice to hear that the germ of the next one is formed and active in your brain.

  8. My comfort on a “to be continued” is that I already know that Holmes and Russell are still married so I have nothing to worry about in the end. It all comes out rather happily. Congrats on the star. I can’t wait for the book!

Speak Your Mind

*

*

css.php